Live in the moment

 

OLIVIA SUNDEEN

ojsundeen10@ole.augie.edu

Sundeen

OMG, she did not just post that on Twitter. Forget that, did you see who just got engaged on Facebook? Come on, you guys, get in this Snapchat with me.

Between the vibrations from text messages and various social network notifications, if it’s not one phone, it’s the other. And, as I sit across the table from my friends, I can’t help but wonder whatever happened to old-fashioned face-to-face conversation.

Like most things in life there are pros and cons. Enhanced technology has given us the opportunity to always be in contact with friends and family. We have the ability to fall in love Catfish-style over the Internet or to say hello to a friend studying in Thailand.

At times, indulging in the luxury of constant communication can be considered a pro. But in doing so we are missing out on the biggest pro of them all: Life.

Life is a pretty big concept to dissect.

As youngsters we tend to plan for the future because we have more of that to look forward to. For older generations, it is easier to look and reflect back on the “good ol’ days” because there is more of that.

But what happens when it is our turn to look back? Will we remember our friends and that epic camping trip, or will we get caught up living vicariously through others on the Internet?

The other day I stumbled across Siddhartha Gautama’s words, “As you walk and eat and travel, be where you are. Otherwise you will miss most of your life.”

I can’t help but look around and feel bad for our generation. Not only because we are missing out, but because we may not even realize we are doing so.

It would take numerous hands to count the endless quotes posted on Facebook pertaining to how we should live life: Y.O.L.O; live in the moment; love the life you live, live the life you love; and so on.

Yes, these may be inspiring and hold some truth amongst the corniness, but if we are really living life why do we feel the need to post about it on social networks?

I admit I am guilty of this. The best example I have is from my trip to South Africa. The first week and a half I struggled to handle heat, the time difference and lack of contact from my social networking world. Numerous pep talks and lost tears later it finally hit me. I can be miserable in this amazing country, missing out on each moment or I take comfort knowing that the Internet and outside world isn’t going anywhere, but I won’t be in South Africa with new friends forever.

As soon as I wrapped my head around that, I lived. I actually embraced being outside of my comfort zone and survived to tell the story. Now that is something I will look back on in years to come.

So I dare you to live in the moment and enjoy it.