AUGIE HISTORY: FRESHMEN RESPONSIBLE FOR BONFIRE

AugieHistoryoriginallypublished

Something seemed to go wrong with the freshman class, in general, about the first of October, so bailiffs Arnie Ordahl and Kermit Johnson were called upon, and many of the wayward juveniles were brought before Judge Orvin Larson for trial and sentence. The principle offence seemed to be the failure to wear the traditional green caps, although other and more serious offences were noted also.

Punishments such as removing the cosmetics from girls’ faces curling the boys’ hair on one side, sweeping the sidewalk from the gym to the “Ad” building so that the sophomores could walk upon it, and attending the theatre, accompanied by one of the opposite sex, were mited out to the offenders. In addition, the boys were sentenced to haul enough wood for the biggest bonfire ever seen here, which was held Friday evening, October 25.

In serving this sentence, the boys encountered numerous and novel experiences. They had hauled but a few loads when, lo and behold, a wheel, a very necessary instrument in the propulsion of the hayrack, decided to slip off. The boys, however, were not dismayed, put it back on its axle, and drove on.

Something must have happened to either wagon or team, however, because the next day a Ford truck was rattling its way back and forth between the ever-growing wood pile and the down-town stores. Back an forth it went, until it, too, played out, for on the evening of the twenty-forth, it was seen being pulled away from the campus by the wrecking car of the Coon Auto Company. Its familiar rattle was gone, and it seemed dead, completely exhausted.

However, that truck remains a hero to the freshman class, for it enabled them to succeed in building the largest bonfire ever seen by an Augustana homecoming crowd. For this the frosh are to be commended and thanked by the entire student body.

Between halves at the football game Saturday, the freshmen were formally accepted into the student body, on a par with the upper-classmen. They shook hands, as a token of peace, with their rivals, the sophomores, and then a bomb exploded, sending two green caps flying over the field and the campus, a sign that the freshmen’s period of servitude was at an end.